Healthcare News June 30, 2012

  • Freshman Rep. West: Nancy Pelosi ‘somewhat delusional’

    Allen West, a freshman member of the Republican Study Committee, called former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) “somewhat delusional” Thursday evening during an interview on Fox News in response to a question from Fox’s Patti Ann Browne.

    “You heard Nancy Pelosi saying, look, if it’s good for the country, basically, who cares how we got there?” Browne said. When asked for his response, West didn’t hold back.

    “Well, I think that former Speaker Pelosi is somewhat delusional, but also you have to remember that this was the person that said that we have to pass this bill in order to find out what is in this bill,” West said from the Capitol Rotunda.

  • Freshman Rep. West: Nancy Pelosi ‘somewhat delusional’

    Allen West, a freshman member of the Republican Study Committee, called former Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) “somewhat delusional” Thursday evening during an interview on Fox News in response to a question from Fox’s Patti Ann Browne.

    “You heard Nancy Pelosi saying, look, if it’s good for the country, basically, who cares how we got there?” Browne said. When asked for his response, West didn’t hold back.

    “Well, I think that former Speaker Pelosi is somewhat delusional, but also you have to remember that this was the person that said that we have to pass this bill in order to find out what is in this bill,” West said from the Capitol Rotunda.

  • Poll: Americans evenly split on Supreme Court ruling

    A new poll shows that Americans are evenly split over the the Supreme Court’s ruling Thursday to uphold the president’s signature healthcare law, with opinions split roughly along partly lines. 

    The survey, released Friday by USA Today and Gallup, showed that 46 percent of Americans believe the law is constitutional, while 46 percent disagree. That’s despite the law remaining somewhat unpopular — 37 percent of those surveyed said they had a favorable view, while 44 percent of respondents did not like the law.

    Whether or not respondents believed the law was constitutional depended largely on an individual’s party affiliation; nearly eight in 10 Democrats said the law did pass constitutional muster, while only 13 percent of Republicans did. Independents were divided, with nearly equal numbers voicing support or objection to the legislation’s constitutionality.

  • GOP governors: No enacting health law until after November

    McDonnell and Jindal say electing Mitt Romney more important than implementing ObamaCare

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